Sunday, 25 October 2009

WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO RUN A 2.05 MARATHON?


Training Log of one Robert Kiprono Cheruiyot
Ma
rathon training:

Very interesting reading, it shows just how important the easy-mod aerobic run is [remember he can run a half marathon in 1 hour] in a well balanced training programme, also note he did only two interval session during the week.
READ MORE

My training

Following Peter Magill's advice I ran one hard and one less hard session plus a long slow run, rest of the runs at easy-mod pace. I will increase up to 10 hours running per week once I get into the new year.
Felt good most of the week until I got ill on Friday
Sun 25th

Easy run sandhills with Tess =43 mins
Sat 24th
After a stomach bug on friday I felt some what better but started to feel drained 40 mins into my long easy run over the sandhills and pinewoods, the last 2 miles felt like hitting the wall in the marathon, I guess the bug took more out of me than I thought! = 2.15
Fri rest

Nutrition for high performance sports

5 comments:

Ewen said...

Yes, 15k in an hour is a very easy run for a runner of his standard.

What's interesting about his schedule (apart from having only two fast days) the is the huge volume (280k per week). 55k on Thursday is big, as is 45k Sunday.

Scott Brown said...

You always give us good links and something to think about Rick. Thanks mate.

I really believe too that doing too many hard sessions is not the way to improve race times but find that when I'm running, even if I set out to do a recovery run, if the weather is good and I get into a groove, I pick up the pace despite my good intentions to take it easy. Maybe I should stop listening to music. Or can anyone think of a better way?

RICK'S RUNNING said...

Thanks for comments, first Ewen the answer to your earlier question is yes you would do only one hard workout during a race week!
scott, Pete Magill never times his recover runs and just runs as his body tells him, yes the music might get you into a faster groove.
You could use a pulse meter and set the alarm to go off once you reach say 110 bpm.
you could run with someone really slow a couple of x a week on your recovery days!
Also try running off road on grass and dirt paths, much better for the legs!

Ewen said...

Thanks Rick. I plan on racing pretty much weekly on the track over summer (using some races as Pre-style practise sessions), so one other hard session sounds right.

Scott, Rick's idea about running with someone slower works well - my runs with Ruth were always easy as her 10k best is about 7 minutes slower than mine. The other thing is to just be disciplined if you have a key hard session planned for the following day. Stop running and walk for a bit. If you don't have a hard session planned you could go with the flow a bit.

scottiedid said...

this is great. how did you find this?